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The highly anticipated movie Deadpool was a disaster for me. Prior to the release of the film, you couldn’t go anywhere without being confronted with a Deadpool trailer or billboard. It was real-life spam at its finest. To be fair, I wasn’t irritated by the sheer amount of trailers, I was actually looking forward to seeing the film.

During the months that preceded the film’s release, I was lead to believe that Deadpool was this subversive anti-hero that poked fun out of your standard super hero movie; a novel super hero, of a satirical nature. However, this archetype was not what I saw in the movie theatre. Albeit, I did enjoy parts of the movie, some of it was funny but it didn’t offer anything new as I was lead to believe. It was still the same run-of-the-mill super hero movie. You may argue “but the love interest being a prostitute was hardly conventional”, and I would agree but it’s hardly satirical. It’s subversive for the sake of being subversive. If the writers wanted to be both, then they could have cast Barry from Eastenders as the love interest. The point is, the girl still fits the typically attractive, damsel-in-distress archetype, the hero’s self-awareness doesn’t change anything and the villain is still the stereotypical villain- an Englishman!

Is there anything you liked?

I found the freeze-frame flashbacks to be an interesting and unique addition, it could have been effective had the plot been half-good. In an interview regarding writing comedy for film, satirical genius Ricky Gervais pointed out, “you can’t just do jokes and funny situations for an hour and a half because it’s a bit laborious.”- this very accurately reveals Deadpool’s shortcomings. The writers were far too trigger-happy with their jokes, it seemed as if they were over-compensating for something… hmm… maybe a poor plotline? The barrage of jokes the writers forced Ryan Reynolds to drill down your throat, coupled with the bizarre, overenthusiastic personality, made him come across as an intense and erratic, unfunny stand up comic who had just ingested his first ecstasy pill. …In other words, I found him quite irritating.

I felt like the jokes had been written by a bunch of middle-aged men, with a basic grasp of social media, trying to appeal to a younger demographic.. [Hold on, I’ll find out who wrote it now] … Rhett Reece and Paul Wernick, two middle-aged guys known for G.I. Joe: Retaliation starring Dwayne Johnson and Bruce Willis!

“The plot wasn’t that bad, was it?”

Let’s break it down: so basically it’s a violent romcom about a mercenary who really likes this prostitute but then he gets cancer so he’s going to die… oh no. So… he thinks he’s going to die but then this creepy looking dude walks into a bar and asks Wade “WHAT IF I TOLD YOU WE CAN FIX UR CANCER AND MAKE U RLY STRONG :0”. Wade is then tortured for a bit until he mutates. Exeunt CANCER. Job done? No, there’s still another hurdle for him yet, the mutation made him really ugly. Now he can’t go back to his girlfriend because he’s really insecure about his appearance. Then he lives with an old blind lady for a bit BUT THEN his ex-girlfriend gets kidnapped by an evil man so he kills them all and they live happily ever after.

“What was your favourite joke from the movie?”

That’s a hard question, with so many wonderful jokes to choose from it’s hard to pick just one. Although there was one that stood out for me:

“You may be wondering ‘why the red suit?’, well that’s so bad guys can’t see me bleed, this guy’s got the right idea, he wore the brown pants.”

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Watch yo profanity.

I love this joke and I will tell you why. Notice how he sets up the joke by commenting on the fact that he has a red suit because he doesn’t want bad guys to see him bleed. The writers then brilliantly flip this on the guy with brown pants by suggesting that by wearing brown pants, nobody will realise that he pooped his pants as the poop would be camoflauged.

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If you didn’t catch the joke, excrement is generally brown unless you have a bleeding ulcer in your lower intestinal track – in which case it would be bright red. This is something that the writers failed to account for when writing the joke. The actor portraying the dude with brown trousers may have had a bleeding ulcer at the time, in which case Deadpool’s joke wouldn’t have made sense (he could have said “this guy has the right idea, he wore bright red pants”). Click the following website (www.everydayhealth.com) for a detailed breakdown of what different colours of excrement can mean.

“I liked Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool, I thought he was perfect for the role”

Since I’ve never read the comics, I don’t know whether this article is a criticism of Deadpool: The Movie or the Deadpool comic book series. So personally, I thought either Ryan Reynolds’ portrayal of Deadpool was poor or I just don’t like Deadpool, he came across as way too full of himself even though he was painfully unfunny. Each joke just seemed far too forced, just as I was forced to cringe as he looked into the camera expecting us to laugh. It’s like when someone shows you a ‘funny’ video on the internet and they turn their head around to look at you, checking to see if you’re laughing or not. In fairness to Ryan, he wasn’t the only one telling shit jokes. There is a scene shortly after Wade Wilson has become ugly, between himself and his bartender friend, where this Seth Rogen/Jurgen Klopp lovechild launches a number of convoluted, unfunny jokes about his appearance.

To conclude, I was unhappy that this film didn’t live up to my expectations of doing what I thought it said was on the tin. I didn’t see what was so different about Deadpool as opposed to other super hero films. It was unclear what his message was, so to me the movie was simply a sesspool of cheap, shock-value profanity (hey, my main body of text includes the title of my article, look how self aware and edgy i am). It was childish, the script could have been written by an 8-year-old and it cost me four quid. Four pounds that I will never get back. Although, if the ticket system in cinemas worked differently and you had to pay the number of pounds equal to the score you feel a film deserved out of ten, then I would still be down four pounds.

4/10

 

8 COMMENTS

  1. Reading this review, you seem to be one in a million – everyone seems to have enjoyed Deadpool more than they have ever dreamed of. In not reading the comics, I feel you have missed the point here – Deadpool is a psychopathic, darkly comedic anti-hero who lives off of awful jokes and puns. He’s meant to be the laughable character that brings a light comedic twist to DC’s Slade Wilson, and the jokes are meant to be poop humour in poor taste. I advise reading the Deadpool comics to get to grips with the character, and see how it nuances your opinion.

    • Just because a lot of people liked the movie doesn’t mean that I will automatically like it too. I doubt reading the comics will change my opinion about the movie as one of my biggest problems with it was the plot- it was extremely lacklustre. The whole point of those dozens of superhero movies is to get as many people as they can in the theatres as possible – this includes people who don’t read comic books (who probably make up at least 75% of the audience)- to make the most money they can out of those movies. So the movie has to work without context, without knowledge of previous details of the character, things like that. Deadpool has to be enjoyable without anyone having to pick up the comic book, that’s how they’re going to make their money. Sure, everyone knows who batman and iron man are, or even deadpool, but their characters in the movies and in the comics work differently- as they are separate mediums. That’s why you have the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) and the Marvel 616 Universe (comic Universe), they’re not the same, their stories are different and that’s the whole point. If you have to be a fan of the comics to like the movie, that’s the studio’s biggest failure.

    • Just because a lot of people liked the movie doesn’t mean that I will automatically like it too. I doubt reading the comics will change my opinion about the movie as one of my biggest problems with it was the plot- it was extremely lacklustre. The whole point of those dozens of superhero movies is to get as many people as they can in the theatres as possible – this includes people who don’t read comic books (who probably make up at least 75% of the audience)- to make the most money they can out of those movies. So the movie has to work without context, without knowledge of previous details of the character, things like that. Deadpool has to be enjoyable without anyone having to pick up the comic book, that’s how they’re going to make their money. Sure, everyone knows who batman and iron man are, or even deadpool, but their characters in the movies and in the comics work differently- as they are separate mediums. That’s why you have the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) and the Marvel 616 Universe (comic Universe), they’re not the same, their stories are different and that’s the whole point. If you have to be a fan of the comics to like the movie, that’s the studio’s biggest failure.

      • But that’s my issue – I don’t think you need to be a fan of the comics to enjoy the film. I only suggested you read the comics to understand that Reynold’s Deadpool is very alike to his origins, and although the Hollywood plot is enhanced it sticks true, in the most part, to Deadpool’s origin story. And even though some of the goals of a cinematic universe may be to bring people into the cinema, you can’t criticise the writers of the film for failing that – they made the adverts amazing, and it honestly felt like a realistic portrayal of what was to come in the film, as well as the character’s humour that is intrinsic to the comic universe.

  2. I agree with Sam. A lot of the humour is based off of the comics, Deadpool is supposed to be immature and stupid, the movie was a reflection and very true portrayal to the source material. Admittedly the plot was thin but the characterisation and the humour was what made it!

  3. The whole point of Deadpool is to flip everything we’ve seen so far from Marvel Studios on its head. It was obscenely gory, it was stupid, and in the end the mercenary protagonist had no motive for his actions other than rescuing the woman he loves. Deadpool doesn’t care about collateral, or saving the day for anyone else, to an extent that would likely drive more familiar characters we’ve seen already, like Cap. America and Thor, completely mad. But that’s the idea – he isn’t supposed to be a hero. He isn’t supposed to be serious. And yet we still root for him.
    With this movie being such a long time coming, I personally think it worked marvelously as a homage to the comics and as a shout out to all the fans who have so eagerly awaited a Deadpool screen outing for so long, including the lead actor himself.
    Conclusively, in reaction to your own closing words, I think in searching for a message in the film or dismissing the toilet humour, you’ve missed the point. It is intended to be childish and ridiculous, in a way much more refreshingly barefaced then the more ‘serious’ products of Marvell Studios like Age of Ultron or the upcoming Civil War. It was meant to be funny. Reynolds acted a Wade Wilson who was perfectly in line with the character of the comics. So if you were to read the comics or at least investigate a little further, you might understand better how perfect the film was for those awaiting it after years of maybes.

  4. While I agree with you on the fact that it was a pretty basic plot, the plot wasn’t the point of the movie at all, but rather the long awaited silver screen debut of the true ‘Merc with a Mouth’. Much like Star Wars: The Force Awakens was a love letter to fans of the Original Trilogy who were dissatisfied with the prequels (and rightly so, but that’s a rant for another time), this movie is what Deadpool fans have been longing for after the abysmal adaptation we were given in X-Men Origins: Wolverine.

    Again, while the plot is simple, it would be way too difficult to introduce this far more accurate version of the character with anything much more complex, and besides, this way his meta humour is put to much better use in being able to de-construct the tropes of the genre. Trust me, the inevitable sequel will likely be more complex, especially if they follow through and include Cable; Cyclops’s militant, cyborg son from an apocalyptic future. You can’t really have a conventional plot with a character like that.

    As for Deadpool himself, as others have said, it’s a pretty damn perfect adaptation that Ryan Reynolds nailed. As the others mentioned, you’d understand that this is exactly how Deadpool is meant to be if you were to read the comics. We’re talking about a guy who, as of his current series, is a word-wide celebrity for his mercenary business that funds the Avengers (on which he is an active member), and has a strained marriage to the succubus queen of the underworld. The juvenile humour is one of his key selling points, and is even more prominent with an entire extended universe of characters to work with, not just Fox’s X-Men. This movie is just the tip of the iceberg; There have been times where he masqueraded as an incredibly drunk Iron Man, tried to join the Heroes for Hire as a blaxsploitation parody of himself and even distracted and killed a group of reincarnated zombie Presidents by dressing up as Marilyn Monroe.

    I could go on, but I’d be typing for days. Ultimately, what you need to understand is that this movie gives us the perfect Deadpool for exactly the reasons why you seem to dislike him. People love him for his childish toilet and meta humour. It’s fine to dislike a character, especially one as niche as Deadpool in the somewhat grounded approach that writers and directors are currently approaching superheroes, but just know that the reasons why you criticise him are exactly the reasons why it works so well.

    • See the comment I made below for a bigger answer. In short- for me, I simply found the character irritating and disagreeable

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